6 Things to Know About Poverty and Education

6 Things to Know About Poverty and Education

Note: For additional information, click the number in parenthesis following each tip.

  1. I think there’s the notion that if you’re poor then you’ll be given all the grants that you could possibly want, but some high school students have the perception that college is not a place for them. There’s a lack of guidance counselors that are directing impoverished students toward college, and a lack of family support. I you’re a first-generation college student you don’t really have someone to lean back on, not only for financial assistance, but for general guidance. (109)
  2. Learn about KIPP schools, No Child Left Behind, other charter schools, school reform movements in various places, the achievement gap and funding disparities. Look at how poor students are doing in their local communities. Learn about after school programs and their potential for forming a bridge between schools and families. (110)
  3. We have this myth that the same level of free public education is provided to everyone. However, schools are generally funded on the property tax in a county. People who live in low-income counties generally don’t have as much income, therefore they don’t own as much valuable property, don’t pay as much in property tax, and therefore the county has less to spend on schools. (111)
  4. Kindergarten is when students start dropping out, when the parents don’t take their children to kindergarten on a regular basis. That’s when they first get into the habit that school and education aren’t important. (112)
  5. Consider these questions: What’s being done to give poor people skills and education that will raise their incomes? Is there an incentive for local employers to keep their workers unskilled and poorly paid? How do day labor places use poor people and immigrants? (113)
  6. Poverty can cause people to cut short their education because they feel they need to drop out of school and go to work. (115)